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Nov 132011
 

Scientific American: Employing the Carabao for Army Purposes in the Philippines

Scientific American is opening its 1845-1909 archive for free, but only until the end of the month. I clicked randomly and found gems like Fifty Years of Photography, the death of Michael Faraday, and the Invention of the Telephone (published a few days before Bell filed his patent). But, given the time frame, I thought that they might have some material on the Philippines. I was wrong—they published a lot of material about us. Below is a selection.

Enjoy the read! Remember: you can’t love someone don’t know, and that goes for your nation too.

They’re only free until November 30, 2011, so save them to your hard disk if you think you’d read them later on ;)

Trade-Marks in the Philippines
Scientific American 88, 371-371 (16 May 1903) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican05161903-371a

Tobacco Raising in the Philippines
Hamilton Wright
Scientific American 96, 152-153 (16 February 1907) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican02161907-152

Gold in the Philippines
Scientific American 80, 356-356 (3 June 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06031899-356d

Employing the Carabao for Army Purposes in the Philippines
Scientific American 82, 99-99 (17 February 1900) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican02171900-99a

The Pirates and Brigands of the Philippines
Scientific American 80, 51-51 (28 January 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican01281899-51b

Cable Laying in the Philippines
Frederick Moore
Scientific American 85, 326-326 (23 November 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican11231901-326

The Wild Tribes of the Philippines
J. B. Steere
Scientific American 78, 407-407 (25 June 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06251898-407

Transport Service to the Philippines—I
Scientific American 84, 182-183 (23 March 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican03231901-182

Army Transport Service in the Philippines—II
Scientific American 84, 262-263 (27 April 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican04271901-262

The Laying of a Pacific Cable
Scientific American 87, 133-133 (30 August 1902) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican08301902-133a

Languages of the Philippines
Scientific American 79, 163-163 (10 September 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09101898-163a

Trade with Our Newly Acquired Territories
Scientific American 81, 178-178 (16 September 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09161899-178c

The Blood of all Races
Scientific American 88, 238-238 (4 April 1903) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican04041903-238

Natural Products and Resources of the Philippine Islands
M. W. Harrington
Scientific American 78, 355-355 (4 June 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06041898-355

Pineapple and Banana Fibers
Scientific American 33, 288-289 (6 November 1875) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican11061875-288b

Shipping Submarines Intact to the Philippines
Scientific American 98, 335-335 (9 May 1908) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican05091908-335a

Colonists for our New Public Lands
Scientific American 88, 54-55 (24 January 1903) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican01241903-54f

Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Philippines
J. B. Steere
Scientific American 78, 395-395 (18 June 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06181898-395

The Climate of our New Possessions
Gustave Michaud
Scientific American 83, 171-172 (15 September 1900) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09151900-171

The Civilized Indians of the Philippines
J. B. Steere
Scientific American 79, 184-187 (17 September 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09171898-184

The Philippine Islands
Scientific American 78, 290-291 (7 May 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican05071898-290a

Some of the Singular Foods of the Filipinos
George D. Rice
Scientific American 84, 35-35 (19 January 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican01191901-35

The Pythons of the Philippine Islands
Scientific American 66, 359-359 (4 June 1892) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06041892-359

The Government Philippine Exposition
Scientific American 91, 64-66 (23 July 1904) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican07231904-64a

The Plant Products of the Philippine Islands
Scientific American 80, 357-357 (3 June 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06031899-357a

The Water Buffalo
W. Ross Cockrill
Scientific American 217, 118-125 (December 1967) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1267-118

A Philippine Leper Colony
Newton Forest Russell
Scientific American 98, 461-462 (27 June 1908) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06271908-461

The Mineral Resources of the Philippine Islands
Scientific American 80, 114-114 (25 February 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican02251899-114b

About Joy Antonio

Joy Antonio is a marketing communications entrepreneur, but she's more famous for helping people with their computer problems. She likes reading mystery novels, playing table tennis, and singing her lungs out in karaoke.
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  2 Responses to “The Philippines in 1845-1909 according to Scientific American”

  1. As a native of Pampanga I’m used to eating fried “bugs”. It’s actually one of our famous delicacies here. It’s an acquired taste, but nevertheless it’s good. By the way, you should try eating fried stuffed frogs too. It may sound like a cliche, but it definitely tastes like chicken. :’)

  2. i like the food part history. I think people should just be opened minded about a lot of things. we’re not the only “insect” eating country. thanks for the info!

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