Condoms: not safe sex

Got these from the Food and Drug Association of the US. Interesting facts that our very own Department of Health does not tell us:

DOH: Condoms are 100% safe and effective. (Heard the DOH Usec say this over at TV Patrol.)

FDA: The surest way to avoid these diseases is to not have sex altogether (abstinence). Another way is to limit sex to one partner who also limits his or her sex in the same way (monogamy). Condoms are not 100% safe, but if used properly, will reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS. Protecting yourself against the AIDS virus is of special concern becuase this disease is fatal and has no cure.

More from FDA:

What is the government doing about condom quality?

Manufacturers “spot check” their condoms using a “water-leak” test. FDA inspectors do a similar test on sample condoms they take from warehouses. The condoms are filled with water and checked for leaks. An average of 996 of 1000 condoms must pass this test.

Will a condom guarantee I won’t get a sexually transmitted disease?

No. There’s no absolute guarantee even when you use a condom. But most experts believe that the risk of getting HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases can be greatly reduced if a condom is used properly.

In other words, sex with condoms isn’t totally “safe sex,” but it is “less risky” sex.

These are what DOH should really tell us. Not spend a freaking $8M to buy condoms from the US! $8M can create freaking jobs and get these sexually active peeps busy with earning money instead of having sex. Gosh how many malnourished kids could be fed with this!!! Not to prevent 100 HIV infected Filipinos from spreading the virus! Millions of other Filipinos can benefit from food and shelter. 😥

Remember, condoms only REDUCE probability of HIV. It doesn’t exactly protect you from it. Besides, if you have HIV, why they heck do you want to spread the virus? Duh?! And a chance of getting 1 of the 4 defective condoms?!?

And the Catholic Church must have done well for our country to only report HIV cases (what, 100~1,000 of them?) just in recent years, whereas the US reported 12 million cases EACH YEAR! Correlate that with condom use (FDA statistics). Ehem.

This is a repost from “Eat My Chalk Dust”. You can view the original post here.

This post was written by Trish Castro.

The Philippines in 1845-1909 according to Scientific American

Scientific American: Employing the Carabao for Army Purposes in the Philippines

Scientific American is opening its 1845-1909 archive for free, but only until the end of the month. I clicked randomly and found gems like Fifty Years of Photography, the death of Michael Faraday, and the Invention of the Telephone (published a few days before Bell filed his patent). But, given the time frame, I thought that they might have some material on the Philippines. I was wrong—they published a lot of material about us. Below is a selection.

Enjoy the read! Remember: you can’t love someone don’t know, and that goes for your nation too.

They’re only free until November 30, 2011, so save them to your hard disk if you think you’d read them later on 😉

Trade-Marks in the Philippines
Scientific American 88, 371-371 (16 May 1903) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican05161903-371a

Tobacco Raising in the Philippines
Hamilton Wright
Scientific American 96, 152-153 (16 February 1907) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican02161907-152

Gold in the Philippines
Scientific American 80, 356-356 (3 June 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06031899-356d

Employing the Carabao for Army Purposes in the Philippines
Scientific American 82, 99-99 (17 February 1900) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican02171900-99a

The Pirates and Brigands of the Philippines
Scientific American 80, 51-51 (28 January 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican01281899-51b

Cable Laying in the Philippines
Frederick Moore
Scientific American 85, 326-326 (23 November 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican11231901-326

The Wild Tribes of the Philippines
J. B. Steere
Scientific American 78, 407-407 (25 June 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06251898-407

Transport Service to the Philippines—I
Scientific American 84, 182-183 (23 March 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican03231901-182

Army Transport Service in the Philippines—II
Scientific American 84, 262-263 (27 April 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican04271901-262

The Laying of a Pacific Cable
Scientific American 87, 133-133 (30 August 1902) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican08301902-133a

Languages of the Philippines
Scientific American 79, 163-163 (10 September 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09101898-163a

Trade with Our Newly Acquired Territories
Scientific American 81, 178-178 (16 September 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09161899-178c

The Blood of all Races
Scientific American 88, 238-238 (4 April 1903) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican04041903-238

Natural Products and Resources of the Philippine Islands
M. W. Harrington
Scientific American 78, 355-355 (4 June 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06041898-355

Pineapple and Banana Fibers
Scientific American 33, 288-289 (6 November 1875) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican11061875-288b

Shipping Submarines Intact to the Philippines
Scientific American 98, 335-335 (9 May 1908) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican05091908-335a

Colonists for our New Public Lands
Scientific American 88, 54-55 (24 January 1903) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican01241903-54f

Volcanoes and Earthquakes in the Philippines
J. B. Steere
Scientific American 78, 395-395 (18 June 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06181898-395

The Climate of our New Possessions
Gustave Michaud
Scientific American 83, 171-172 (15 September 1900) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09151900-171

The Civilized Indians of the Philippines
J. B. Steere
Scientific American 79, 184-187 (17 September 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican09171898-184

The Philippine Islands
Scientific American 78, 290-291 (7 May 1898) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican05071898-290a

Some of the Singular Foods of the Filipinos
George D. Rice
Scientific American 84, 35-35 (19 January 1901) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican01191901-35

The Pythons of the Philippine Islands
Scientific American 66, 359-359 (4 June 1892) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06041892-359

The Government Philippine Exposition
Scientific American 91, 64-66 (23 July 1904) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican07231904-64a

The Plant Products of the Philippine Islands
Scientific American 80, 357-357 (3 June 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06031899-357a

The Water Buffalo
W. Ross Cockrill
Scientific American 217, 118-125 (December 1967) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1267-118

A Philippine Leper Colony
Newton Forest Russell
Scientific American 98, 461-462 (27 June 1908) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican06271908-461

The Mineral Resources of the Philippine Islands
Scientific American 80, 114-114 (25 February 1899) doi:10.1038/scientificamerican02251899-114b

First-time Flowergirl

Reese the flower girlYesterday, my three-year-old daughter walked down the aisle as the sole flowergirl of my high school best friend, JoAnne. Three days prior, Reese developed bad colds and a slight fever. I called JoAnne’s sister, “Reese is sick, but don’t tell your sister! I’ll have her up and running by Saturday!” Why do kids like getting sick right before a Big Day? Ugh!

Thankfully, the fever didn’t recur. And the colds were tolerable. Reese prepared for her mini-Big Day by having her makeup trial with her in-house makeup artist (aka Tita Anj!) a few days before the wedding. And we downloaded flowergirl videos from YouTube. After watching the videos, Reese understood what she had to do. “I’m going to sprinkle the flowers on the aisle!”

Then came the practice walks on our sidewalk. Done! The dress was another exciting matter altogether. Since my friend JoAnne was organizing the wedding from abroad, a brouhaha apparently happened with her seamstress here in the Philippines. My brother came to the rescue. Scouring the malls, he brought to life the ballerina flowergirl idea of JoAnne–over-the-top from head to toe. Whew!

The preparations did pay off! Reese walked down the aisle by herself, and guests commented on how comfortable her flowergirl get-up was. During the ceremony, she happily (but quietly, thank God!) wriggled and sauntered up and down the aisle unbeknownst to my friends who were exchanging their vows. Reese spent her time at the reception running around and redecorating the stage with balloons.

Once we boarded the van for going home, my first-time flowergirl whispered, “I want to sleep, Mom!” And I kissed her on the head and said, “Good job, Reese! Mommy’s so proud of you!”

This post was written by Meg Murrf Trinidad.