Tag Archives: concealer

Getting ready for your close-up: how to look nice in pictures

Admittedly, I am not the most photogenic person in the world. Add to that my current battle with acne, and you’ll understand why I was anxious about the recent photo op that took place at our office for our new IDs. On the day of the shoot (what else am I supposed to call it?), I spent a little extra time on my make-up, working hard to conceal my pimples and scars.

Having managed to make myself look presentable for my mug shot—and with the evidence to prove it (scroll down please)—I thought I’d list a few of the things I did in preparation for having my picture taken.

Ace your base. Sounds like the name of that 90s band; I couldn’t resist, sorry 🙂 Making your base as flawless as possible is key to looking good in pictures. You’ll want to carefully conceal blemishes and any discoloration, taking care to blend your concealer well into your foundation so that no part of your face is abnormally paler than the others.

Take time to define. In order to NOT look washed out in pictures, there are certain features that you need to define with product. These are your eyebrows, lashlines (both top and bottom), and lips. I filled in bare spots in my brows with a grayish-brown pencil, lined my eyes with brown liner, and stained my lips with just a bit of pink lipstick. Of course, I also applied mascara, eyeshadow, and blush/bronzer (not that my contouring was obvious, thanks to my chubby cheeks).

Classic is basic. (Okay, this rhyming thing is getting harder to sustain.) The thing about pictures is that they’ll be around for a really long time. With this in mind, I think it’s better to stick to neutral tones and not opt for shades that are too dramatic or trendy. Case in point: I used shades of peaches and browns on my lids, and soft pink on my cheeks and lips. Keep in mind that this was for an official ID, so I couldn’t really do a smoky eye, now could I? Although I volunteered to do it for an officemate whose make-up I worked on, I’m not surprised she refused 🙂

One last thing, makeup pros discourage the use of foundation/concealer with SPF in it for pictures. It seems the SPF, combined with the camera flash, results in a face that is too white, too pale, too reminiscent of ghosties. Personally, I haven’t had this experience, but I just stick to SPF-less foundation for pictures to be on the safe side.

And now, are you ready for the unveiling? Here we go…

Apart from that pimple above my left eyebrow (which I’m officially claiming is a birthmark which I’ve had since…erm, birth), I think I did okay. Looking at it, you wouldn’t know that I have a bit of an acne situation at the moment.

What do you think? 🙂

This post was written by Anj de la Cruz.

On makeup and being the real you

I like makeup. A lot. I believe that, while makeup is by no means necessary for existence, it nevertheless adds spice and interest to life.

Below are some of the reasons why:

First, makeup serves to enhance what’s already there. I never cease to be amazed at how just the littlest amount of mascara (one of the two items I am never without, the other being lip balm) make my eyes stand out just a tad bit better, or how a swirl or two of blush makes me look more awake and alive even after a late night out. Makeup takes what Mother Nature gave you and works with it so that you look like a better, more polished version of yourself.

Second, makeup is one of the many ways by which I can express myself. At work, my looks tend to be more sedate, although I do a smoky eye every now and then just to liven things up a bit. However, when I go out with family and friends, I tend to favor more colorful combinations (purple and plum shadows with teal eyeliner, you get the picture).

And while we’re on the topic of self-expression, I might as well say that I have a lot of respect for those artists and enthusiasts who are able to come up with avant garde looks (i.e. makeup that you wouldn’t really wear to work or any other real-life situation, unless you’re a runway model). Makeup is an art form, after all, with creativity and imagination setting the limits.

Third, you can work with as few or as many products as you desire or feel comfortable with. Sometimes when I do makeup on myself or on other people, I find that I will use four or five eyeshadows to achieve the effect I want (and that’s just the eyes). However, if for you a made-up face consists of using only concealer, powder, and lipstick, that’s fine, too. If there’s one thing I’ve realized over the years, it’s that there is no fixed rule on the number of products you “need”. Magazines and websites can go on and on about how a product like, let’s say eyeliner, is essential to anyone’s arsenal. But if you know that you’re not going to use it, why buy yourself a tube?

In the end, it’s about using products that work for you and your lifestyle. It’s about creating a look for yourself that makes your day just that wee bit brighter, your stride a bit more confident.

This post was written by Anj de la Cruz.