Tag Archives: eyes

Eye make-up basics: the different parts of the eye

Whenever I talk to friends who are just learning how to apply make-up, they often tell me that they are mystified by instructions such as “Blend such-and-such a color into your socket line” or “Line both top and bottom waterlines.” I don’t blame them. It took me quite awhile before I could understand such instructions myself, so I understand how newbies would have a bit of difficulty in deciphering directions of this sort.

In this post, I’m going to walk you through the different parts of the eye (in terms of make-up application, that is). I’ve also included some pictures with the areas being described marked out.

The lid. When applying eyeshadow, the lid is where the base color usually goes. A base color is either the same color as your skin (and in applying it you’re just evening out your eye area color) OR the medium/middle shade in a three- or four-shade eyeshadow palette. The lid area starts at the upper lashline all the way up to the crease or socket line. Where’s the crease, you say? Read on…

Your eyelid

The crease or socket line. Gently pat your eyelids with a finger, and feel for the area where the eyeball ends and your eye area recedes or seems to go deeper. That area is your crease or socket line. In most make-up looks, the crease is where the darker colors are placed. The idea is to recess this area even further, to make the eye look more deep-set. However, if you’re like most Asians, you’ll probably find that you have monolids, i.e. you don’t have a defined crease. No worries! There are a host of other ways by which you can define your peepers; I’ll talk about this in a future post.

I have monolids myself, but this is the general area where the crease should be.

The outer corner. This refers to the corner of your eye farthest from your nose. Apply darker colors here and blend softly inwards, going in about one-third the length of your eye (the color here should blend with any color you applied in the crease, if applicable). Darkening this area also helps to define the eyes and make them look deep-set. For people with monolids, applying dark colors here and blending inwards works to give the illusion of deeper-set eyes (better than trying to create the illusion of a crease where there is none).

The outer corner

The inner corner. The reverse of the outer corner, this refers to the corner of your aye nearest to your nose. Unless you have really large eyes, you usually cannot afford to apply dark colors in this area; doing so makes your eyes look smaller. Instead, highlight this area with light/shimmery shades to give you a wide-awake/refreshed look. Any color applied here should be blended softly outwards (i.e. away from the nose), going about one-third the length of your eye.

The inner corner

The browbone. This is the area right below the brow. It’s hard to miss this: there is literally a bone in this area. Light shades are applied here to highlight the area. Shimmer works, but don’t overdo it; you want to be very subtle in emphasizing this area.

See that whiter area where the light hits? That’s the browbone.

The upper lashline. The area where your top eyelashes are, this is where you apply eyeliner and/or false eyelashes. Lining the eyes, when done the right way, makes the eyes pop and can either emphasize or subtly change their shape (depending on the effect that you want to achieve).

The lower lashline. This is where your bottom lashes are. Eyeliner is also applied in this area. You can also add false eyelashes, but they’re a bit trickier to attach here.

The bottom waterline. This is the area that’s practically inside your eyes already, requiring you to go in further than your lower lashline. Applying eyeliner here takes a bit of getting used to. A dark eyeliner applied here works for smoky, sultry looks. A light eyeliner–white, or pale yellow–makes the eyes look bigger and brightens them as well.

The bottom waterline

The top waterline. Like the bottom waterline, but on top (i.e. underneath your top lashes). “What?! You want me to apply my eyeliner there? What if  I poke my eye?” Well, this isn’t for everyone. Even I have yet to master applying my eyeliner here without being reduced to tears. But applying eyeliner here (usually pencil, or cake eyeliner with a wet brush) makes your lashes look fuller without mascara, so I think this is a trick worth learning.

(Note to self: If you want to apply eyeliner here, do it BEFORE applying mascara. I once tried doing it after mascara, and it hurt like anything 🙂 )

See the top lashes? Drawing on your top waterline will require you to bring the liner underneath those lashes. Yikes!

There are so many ways to apply eye make-up that what I’ve just said will not apply to all types of looks. But these guidelines are generally applicable, and they are definitely useful to a beginner.

Remember that blending is key; there should be no visible demarcation lines between one color and the next, or from one area of the eye to another. Hope this helps!

This post was written by Anj de la Cruz.

Getting your make-up to last

I’ve heard that people with an oily skin type are lucky because the extra moisture in their skin slows down the aging process. (If this were a Facebook post, this is where I’d hit the “Like” button.) However, I can’t help but be frustrated when my carefully-applied make-up melts after only an hour or two; I have better things to do with my time than to reapply my “face” several times a day. And so, over the years, I’ve made it a habit to take note of and experiment with techniques and products that will help my make-up to last longer.

Here are some tips, tricks, and products that you can incorporate into your make-up routine:

Use a primer. Applied before foundation, this product is especially crucial for those with combination/oily skin, but those with drier skin types will also benefit from using this product. A pea-sized amount is usually enough to cover the entire face; you can also blend it down unto the neck area.

Smashbox Photo Finish Foundation Primer and Mary Kay Oil Mattifier

Work foundation into the skin. Different methods of application—by hand, using a sponge, using a brush–are recommended by different make-up artists; experiment and stick to the method you prefer. The important thing is to blend well with gentle but firm strokes; make sure the product is not just sitting on the surface. Also, setting with powder helps. Blend the powder well, too, so your face doesn’t look cakey; you don’t want to look like an espasol.

Spend a bit more time on your eyes. You can opt to use an eyeshadow primer. But the key to getting your eyeshadows to last is to apply, blend, apply, and blend again. Layering is key. You’ll get more staying power if you apply a little product at a time and slowly build up intensity rather than applying tons of shadow all in one go. Also, matte finish shadows–as opposed to shimmery or frosty ones–generally stay longer on  the lids.

A couple of eye primers: Stila Prime Pot and Smashbox Photo Finish Lid Primer

Use waterproof foundation and eye products if you have them. These really make a difference in terms of longevity. Keep in mind though that waterproof make-up will usually require special removers. Oh and if you will only ever invest in one waterproof product, let it be mascara.

From top to bottom: Max Factor Colour Perfection Pencil Eyeliner; MAC Loud Lash (this mascara really does not budge, but it can be difficult to remove afterwards); Maybelline Hyper Curl Mascara; and K-Palette Real Lasting Liquid Eyeliner

A make-up fixative is helpful, but not necessary. After you’ve finished applying your products, hold the fixative about 12 inches away from your face and spritz 3-4 times to cover your face and neck; wait awhile and then blot the excess lightly with a facial tissue. This should help your look stay in place even longer.

Make Up For Ever Mist & Fix

Retouching is key. During the course of the day (or night), lightly blot any areas that have gotten a tad shiny with oil absorbency sheets or one sheet of facial tissue. Dust powder lightly only on the areas that need it, since applying all over could make you look cakey. Assuming you applied your makeup well in the first place, the only other makeup product that you will need to reapply is lipstick/lip gloss.

This post was written by Anj de la Cruz.