Tag Archives: onions

How to cook the perfect Crispy Pata at home

It would be nice and deadly if the crispy pata will be cook deep-fried, but considering the economics of it, being cooking oil is expensive these days, not to mention that it’s really not good for your health, we always cook our crispy pata in our turbo broiler.

We have two kinds of turbo broiler, the really ancient steel looking kind one, and one of those new, glass ones where you can actually see the fat dripping from the meat. If you’re to ask me, I would prefer to use the newer one because it’s user-friendly. You can set the temperature and can actually see the meat inside. But with the old one, which is what we’re all accustomed to using, is a matter of gut feel. You’ll know that the food is done by using your senses and/or a cooking thermometer.

My family loves food. Healthy, deadly, name it and we’re always craving for something. But the big Crispy is a one-time deal. Meaning, if we eat crispy pata today, it’ll take a few months till we cook it again. It’s a conscious effort on our part because the dish just spells “heart attack” all over it.

To achieve the crispiest, juiciest and most succulent crispy pata at home, you only have to do a few things. No need to go to a fancy restaurant and order it there. You can buy at least two “pata” for the usual price of a crispy pata in our local restaurants, not mention they’re sometimes dry on the inside because of overcooking.

  1. Boil your patas first. Yes. You have to boil them to achieve the tenderness inside and to make sure that your pata is well-cooked all the way. Make sure to season your water with a generous amount of salt, enough to taste like salted water BUT not a “sea water”-type of saltiness. Add few cloves of garlic—no need to peel them, just smash them with the back of your knife. Add a couple of shallots or a piece of onion, cut in half, and a few pieces of whole peppers.
  2. Let it rest. Before wrapping it in foil, rub some more seasonings to it. I usually rub in fish sauce (patis) and pepper, but just enough to coat the skin. Then wrap it tightly with foil or cling wrap.
  3. Put it in the freezer for at least a day. Yes my dearies! The secret to a crispy, crispy pata is to make sure that it’s been boiled and kept in the freezer for at least 24 hours. A freshly-boiled and seasoned crispy pata will not crisp enough. There will be no “lutong” factor.
  4. A great sauce can accompany a great dish too. Sarsa lechon is somehow being used by the upper class, because they associate crispy pata with the like of a lechon too. But a true-blooded meat lover will know that the combination of toyo-mansi with onions and sili will make you screaming for “isang tasang kanin pa nga!”

Don’t feel bad serving your family crispy pata once in awhile. Besides, if you use the turbo broiler, half of the fat will be remove from the meat already. Enjoy eating!

This post was written by Rita Salonga.

How to cook fried stuffed Bangus

I like to cook. Some people say do not cook when you’re sad or in a bad mood because it’ll reflect on the food you’re cooking. I, on the other hand, cooking is my remedy for stress and bad moods. Cooking makes me happy. It brings me back my sanity when the world around me seemed insanely chaotic. If I stop cooking, that’ll be the end of me.

My whole family is my willing victims when I’m experimenting with food. There are some hits and misses I tell you, but nothing worst so far as to one of them losing totally their sense of taste. If there’s one thing that I’ve learned in culinary school is that “know the basics rules first before you start breaking them”. That’s what I always apply whenever I’m trying a new dish or tweaking an old recipe.

Last week, my mom requested Fried Stuffed Milkfish (Bangus). My dad and my sister are both carnivorous and it’s rare that we serve fish in the dining table. They only eat a handful of seafood dishes, and it’ll be such a waste if we cook too much dishes for just the four of us.

You’re aware that frying the milkfish is a dirty job. No matter how hot the oil is, there will always be splatter. And I hate oil splatter on my kitchen. It irritates me to death. So, I found a way on how to avoid splatter by wrapping the fish in aluminum foil. (Not all food can be wrapped in aluminum foil when frying, avoid any acids if possible.)

I sliced the Bangus in half, but not entirely, just so I can insert the stuffing. For the stuffing, I put mix in onions, garlic, tomatoes salt and pepper, siling haba (optional) and sometimes if I feel like making it extra special, I put in some slices of red eggs. But to each its own. Whatever you fancy, go ahead and I won’t take it against you 😉 I minced chopped everything so that the cooking time will be the same for everything that’s stuffed in the Bangus.

Grease the aluminum foil very well with salt and or some dried herbs if you have. I usually use dried thyme or rosemary. Wrapped the Bangus carefully, make sure that the Bangus is well stuffed. Depends on the size and weight of the Bangus, usually I give 5-7 minutes cooking time on both sides of a regular-sized bangus. I don’t put the temp too high, just on medium heat because you’re in a way steaming the fish inside first.

The fried Bangus is good with soup or sautéed vegetables. I usually accompany it with my simplified version of chopsuey. For the spicy food lover in me, I prepare a special hot dipping sauce of soy sauce, calamansi juice, sugar to taste and a lot of siling labuyo. Yummy!

In cooking something, it should always come from the heart. If I can advice someone about cooking, don’t cook when your heart’s not into it. No matter how expensive the ingredients are or how easy the recipe is, if you don’t feel like cooking, it won’t work. Annyeong!!!

This post was written by Rita Salonga.